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5 Low glycaemic index foods to control your blood sugar

5 Low glycaemic index foods to control your blood sugar

Certain foods are linked to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. But by making a few wise dietary choices you could bring down or stabilise your blood sugar

Porridge

Consistently eating foods that are high in fat and low in fibre, and carbohydrates with a high GI (glycaemic index), can raise your diabetes risk.

Oats are a low-fibre, low GI food—meaning they don’t cause sudden rises and dips in blood glucose—and contain healthy fats. Adding milk to your porridge increases the fat content, so opt for skimmed or soya.

Blueberries

Bowl of blueberries, a low glycaemic foodA serving of blueberries three times a week can help keep your blood sugar in check

Most fresh fruit have low GI scores, though levels creep up as they ripen. Especially good if you’re hoping to avoid type 2 diabetes are blueberries, grapes and apples. These were associated with a lower risk of developing the condition in a large 2013 American study, with blueberries coming out top of the table.

Aim for three servings a week of these diabetes-friendly fruits—on your porridge perhaps. Overall, a diet high in fruit and vegetables is a must if you’re committed to controlling blood sugar.

Sweet potato

Cut down on white potatoes and opt for the sweet, orange-coloured variety. They have a much lower GI score and the flesh is also high in fibre.

Garlic

Serving of raw garlicGarlic supplements can support you in keeping post-meal glucose down

We love garlic and rightly so—in a 2013 Indian study of 60 people with type 2 diabetes and obesity, participants who took metformin, a drug prescribed to lower blood glucose, and garlic capsules had lower fasting and post-meal blood glucose levels than volunteers who took just metformin.

Another 2017 study from China found garlic supplements had a beneficial effect on blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Eat it raw, cooked or take it in supplement form.

Yoghurt

But, hang on, yoghurt is a high-fat dairy product and to be avoided, right? Not necessarily. It’s high in saturated fat, but a large 2013 American study indicates it can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Plain yoghurt has a low GI score. Choose the unflavoured, unsweetened variety or Greek yoghurt over more sugary flavoured or sweetened yoghurts.

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