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The benefits of AHA body scrubs

The benefits of AHA body scrubs

Breakouts can happen in places other than your face, especially during hotter summer months. Jenessa Williams investigates the benefits of AHA body acne scrubs  

What are AHA body scrubs?

Breakouts can happen in places other than your face. As we strip off for summer, some might notice that they have acne of the buttocks, back, shoulders and chest, or potentially even more intimate parts.

"Introducing a body cleanser into your skincare routine can be a good preventative"

Sometimes these marks are superficial, but often they can be quite painful, difficult to reach or examine in a mirror. As such, introducing a body cleanser into your skincare routine can be a good preventative, helping to reduce the build-up of bacteria or excess sebum.

What are the benefits?

Woman putting on suncream

The summer combo of sweat, suncream, pool chlorine and body spray can cause your skin to play up 

In summer especially, the combination of sweat and suncream can play havoc with our skin, as can pool chlorine, fake tanning lotion or even body sprays.  

If you’re prone to below-the-neck blackheads, you’ll want to look for a gentle exfoliant that contains AHA’s (alpha hydroxy acids), gently exfoliating the skin without adding extra oil.  

"In summer especially, the combination of sweat and suncream can play havoc with our skin"

Ceramides, hyaluronic acid and salicyclic acid are popular ingredients, while benzoyl peroxide might be appropriate for more stubborn spots, working as an anti-inflammatory (although it is worth noting that benzoyl peroxide can bleach clothing). If you experience keratosis pilaris—small bumps that appear on the backs of your arms and legs—glycolic and lactic acid might also fit the bill, although those with sensitive skin are encouraged to tread carefully.   

Do they actually work?

Woman putting on body scrub

Exfoliating just once a week can do wonders for your skin

The effectiveness of a body acne cleanser is beholden to a great many factors; skin type, genetics, age, hormones, stage of the menstrual cycle. But much like the cleansers that many of us use on our face, the science does check out. For particularly potent or cystic acne, a meeting with a dermatologist might be a sensible first step, but once you find the formula for you, a once-weekly gentle exfoliation can be just the thing to keep your skin blemish-free more often than not.  

Given that the skin on your body tends to be thicker than that on your face, higher concentrations of certain ingredients might be necessary for effective penetration. After a deep cleanse, your skin will be particularly sensitive to the sun’s UV rays, so make sure to use SPF and take shade where possible to avoid damage.  

"Even if you’re not willing to invest in more-high end products, small actions of change can make all the difference"

Even if you’re not willing to invest in more-high end products, small actions of change can make all the difference; changing sweaty clothes as quickly as possible, showering more frequently. With time, patience and the right product, it is distinctly possible to manage body acne as part of your regular hygiene routine. 

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