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Fashion and beauty trends to look out for in 2023

Fashion and beauty trends to look out for in 2023

New year, new trends? We explore the data to find out what fashion and beauty trends we can expect to crop up in the coming year

For the fashion-forward, staying ahead of the latest trends is a priority, but it can also be a lot of pressure. It’s hard to predict what will be popular next week, let alone next year. 

Digital marketing agency Embryo looked at search data from the past year to explore emerging trends that we can expect to be at the forefront of fashion and beauty for 2023. 

Sustainable Choices

Sustainability has been a common trend across both fashion and beauty. In the realm of beauty and skincare, there was 8,700 per cent growth in searches for plant-based products. The vegan beauty space has really grown in recent years, with a huge range of brands to choose from on any budget.

"Sustainability has been a common trend across both fashion and beauty"

One product that really took centre stage is the reusable eye mask, with a 7,100 per cent growth in searches in the last year. These are silicone patches that can be placed over your favourite serum or cream for maximum absorption and hydration. Wash them with warm water and gentle soap between uses. Rather than buying single-use under-eye gel masks, invest in one that you can use over and over again, making it environment- and wallet-friendly!

The growing interest in sustainable options may be linked to social media. Data Analyst at Embryo, Danny Waites, says, “Choosing to shop more sustainably is something we’ve noticed in the beauty space as people are choosing more selectively where they’re purchasing their items both online and in-store. We have also seen how influencers are helping to guide people when purchasing beauty products through Instagram, TikTok and YouTube, helping buyers visualise how products could work for them.”

Back to basics

In the beauty space, there has been an increased interest in more pared-back, natural products. For example, “rice water shampoo" experienced a 342 per cent growth in searches. It’s is a cleansing hair product that is made, as the name suggests, out of rice water—that is, water that has been used to boil or soak rice. 

"There has been an increased interest in more pared-back, natural products"

Rice water shampoo dates back to Ancient China and is believed to contain antioxidants and nutrients that can be good for your hair, such as Vitamin E and magnesium. It’s also possible to make your own rather than splashing out on one in a fancy bottle. 

There has also been a 233 per cent growth in searches for “rosemary oil”, with 271k searches in the last year. When on a budget, it’s great to find products that do twice the work, and rosemary oil delivers. 

Rosemary oil

Rosemary oil is believed to offer many benefits

Studies have suggested that rosemary oil can prevent hair loss and support hair growth. To use it, dilute it with a carrier oil such as coconut oil and massage it onto your scalp, or mix it into your shampoo. Other possible benefits of rosemary oil include improving circulation, easing stress and relieving pain. 

Returning trends

This may come as no surprise to anyone who has social media but y2k is making a triumphant return. Searches for “y2k outfits” grew by 284 per cent in the last year, with over 12,000 searches. 

Before you head to Asos or H&M to grab yourself a pair of cargo pants, consider having a look in your local charity shop or seeing what items you (or your parents) never threw out from the 2000s. As trends return it’s the perfect opportunity to give older items a new lease on life.

Brand PR Manager at Embryo, Jo Threlfall, says, “As a thrifty shopper who lives in quite a fashion-led city, I can see how much people have engaged with Y2K trends on social media in Manchester. Staple items such as cargo pants have grown in popularity in the north west, and this is down to platforms like TikTok and Instagram influencing people’s decisions to switch up their hair and fashion looks. These trends will keep growing in popularity in the new year as people use the platforms like Pinterest to put together vision boards of inspiration that will help them switch up their style in 2023.”

Another returning trend that goes a little further back is the wolf cut. Searches for “wolf haircut” grew by 2,300 per cent, having been repopularised by celebrities like Billie Eilish and Miley Cyrus

The origins of the wolf cut are not clearcut—it has been referred to as a hybrid of the 1970s shag and the 1980s mullet, as well as credited to South Korean beauty salons and K-Pop icons. Nowadays, it is associated with Gen Z. It’s an edgy cut that supposedly suits everyone, consisting of short choppy layers on the top and longer layers on the back and sides. 

"The most sustainable fashion and beauty choices are the things you already own"

Whether fashion or beauty, it’s always good to see trends returning, as it encourages us to look within our wardrobes and see what we can put together with what we already have. This goes hand-in-hand with a commitment to sustainability—the most sustainable fashion and beauty choices are the things you already own. 

It’s also a reminder that trends come and go, so if you’re dreading the return of low-waisted jeans, don’t worry—you don’t need to buy into it! High-waisted skinny jeans will be back soon, I promise.

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