Ultimate Munich city guide

Jenessa Williams

When you think of Munich, chances are your mind drifts straight to Oktoberfest, but Munich is more than steins and lederhosen—it’s a multicultural region that offers plenty of fusion food, interactive learning and great public transport. Here’s how to experience Bavarian culture in all its glory…

Stay

Just a 25-minute shuttle ride from the airport, the Pullman Hotel Munich is a convenient oasis in the hustle and bustle of the city.

Take rest in their roomy suites and rooms featuring balconies and garden views or dine at your leisure at the Theos restaurant and bar, which serves contemporary Bavarian cuisine and delicious cocktails.

Pullman Munich

All decorated in soothing tonal hues that complement the city’s architecture, the outdoor terrace and beer garden is the perfect place to take a casual meeting, liaise with friends or simply plan out your day of activities. 

Book directly through Pullman Hotels to secure the best rate and allow their diligent staff to do the rest.

 

Eat

Fine dining experiences don’t come much better than Broeding. With simple décor and no dress code, their set menu allows the food to do the real talking, blending Austrian and European cuisines in their daily-changing menu. Their onsite wine shop allows you to take a souvenir of the evening away into the night, way past closing time. 

Broeding Munich

For something a little out of the ordinary, Dinnerhopping will provide a truly memorable experience. Climbing aboard the rolling diner bus, you’ll experience a nocturnal tour of the city with charming, well-informed waitstaff, who serve up local knowledge alongside tasty eats and paired beverages. 

Themed to different cuisines and occasions, this experience is hugely popular— book early to secure your preferred sitting.

 

Shop

Munich is quite the hotspot for fashionistas and independent shoppers. The Fünf Höfe ticks multiple boxes with its onsite art galleries, boutiques and home stores, as well as the stunning architecture of the building itself. 

Fünf Höfe

Continue the sense of opulence on Maximilianstraße, where designer stores are concealed within tall, nineteenth centuries buildings. 

For vintage and second-hand, the up-and-coming student district of Englischer Garten is ideal for used bookshops, upcycled clothing retailers and quirky cafes. 

Take your time to enjoy the stroll around the neighbourhood to take in museums or hire a bike in the springtime to make the most of the local parks.

 

Learn

At the heart of Catholic southern Germany, Munich is a highly religious state and Sundays are very treated as a day of rest. If you prefer to be chasing your culture fix, all state museums are just one-euro entry on a Sunday, ideal for tourists tight on time. 

Brandhorst

The Glypothek is perfect for fans of ancient sculpture, while the Brandhorst features modern art from the likes of Damien Hirst and Andy Warhol. There’s even the Kartoffel museum—an entire building dedicated to potatoes. Only in Germany!

If you prefer to spend your Sunday with a pint in hand, a trip to the Paulaner Bräuhaus is a must. Take a tour to learn how they brew their world-famous beverage or take a seat in the lengthy beer hall with a traditional schnitzel-and-stein lunch. 

 

Get outdoors

Schloss Nymphenburg is a beautiful place to visit, a sumptuous palace set within elegant gardens. Visit in Spring to get the best views and invest in a Munich card to save money at this and various other publication attractions. 

Home of the 1972 Games, Olympiapark is one for thrill-seekers, offering roof climbing expeditions and bungee jumping right into the stadium itself. The tower offers 360-degree views right across the city, as well as a revolving restaurant and café, a must-visit for a romantic date or special treat. 

Olympiapark