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How to keep cut flowers fresh (the right way)

How to keep cut flowers fresh (the right way)
Cut flowers brighten up any room—until they inevitably wilt, that is. Florist Igor Podyablonskiy busts flower care myths to keep your cut flowers fresh longer
Enhancing any room in your home with cut flowers is a simple and efficient method, but without proper care, their vitality can fade within days.
Numerous misconceptions about cut flower care can hinder the optimal condition of your blooms. Here, flower experts, My Flowers separate fact from fiction.

Myth 1: Location

Keep your cut flowers in a cool place away from direct sunlight
Many people mistakenly believe that cut flowers should be placed in a sunny location. However, this accelerates the flowering process, resulting in a shorter lifespan for your bouquet. Instead, cut flowers should be kept in a cool spot away from direct sunlight.
"Place the bouquet in a location with a consistent temperature, away from heat sources"
Ideally, place the bouquet in a location with a consistent temperature, away from heat sources such as radiators or vents. By providing a cool environment, you can help extend the freshness and beauty of your bouquet.

Myth 2: Petal prep

Another common misconception is that removing guard petals from flowers, especially roses, will cause harm. Guard petals serve the purpose of protecting inner buds, so gently peeling them off won't negatively affect the flower. Instead, it allows younger and pristine petals to flourish.
Similarly, removing anthers, the part of the flower that contains pollen, does not harm the flower as some believe. In fact, removing anthers can prevent staining of furniture, flooring, and flower petals, and can help if anyone in your household suffers from pollen allergies.

Myth 3: Water

There is a common myth that adding aspirin, bleach or other substances to the water in a vase can extend the life of flowers. However fresh, clean water is the best option. Using plain room temperature water is sufficient for keeping bouquet flowers hydrated.
"It's important to change the water every few days to prevent the growth of bacteria"
It's important to change the water every few days to prevent the growth of bacteria, which can clog the stems and reduce water uptake.
When changing the water, it's also a good opportunity to give the stems a fresh cut at 45-degrees to promote better water absorption.
While some commercial flower preservatives may help to provide additional nutrients and inhibit bacterial growth, they are optional and not necessary for the basic care of cut flowers. Simply ensuring that the water is clean and changing it regularly is often enough to keep bouquet flowers fresh and vibrant.

Additional advice

The gases released by fruit can make your cut flowers bloom, and then die, more quickly
As mentioned, it is crucial to keep your flowers away from direct sunlight, but it is equally important to keep them away from the fruit bowl. The gases released by fruit can cause flowers to bloom faster and fade more quickly.
Feeding your flowers is also crucial. Plant food can be obtained online or from flower shops, but there are also household remedies that work effectively. A combination of apple cider vinegar and sugar can be poured into the vase to rejuvenate the blooms, as can fizzy drinks like soda and lemonade.
"A combination of apple cider vinegar and sugar can be poured into the vase to rejuvenate the blooms"
If you plan to be away for a few days, you can store your flowers in the vase inside your refrigerator to maintain their freshness and vibrancy.
In conclusion, caring for cut flowers is not as complicated as it may seem, but it does require some attention to detail and dispelling common myths.
Plus, by following a few simple steps, you can ensure that your cut flowers remain vibrant and beautiful for a longer period.
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