Is cottagecore the key to a peaceful life?

Bindu Gopal Rao 20 October 2021

We investigate the growing popularity of the “cottagecore” trend and why it’s providing a sense of peace for so many

The pandemic-induced lockdown threw up many trends, but one that shows no sign of dwindling is “cottagecore”.

So, what is cottagecore all about? Cottagecore is a social media trend seen as a romanticised interpretation of countryside living, where cottage-dwellers are make homemade jam, live off the land. Immersion in this trend provides its fans with a sense of escapism from the fast-paced modern environment many of us live in.

Naomi Stuart, who documents her countryside dream on her cottagecore Instagram page @grove_cottage_,says, “the trend has become far more popular since lockdown, with people looking for rural properties now they can work from home.

Gorgeous images on social media of living in the countryside have sold the dream that life out in the sticks is less stressful. And it is. I share my cottage life as I hope it will give people a little insight into what living in a small village surrounded by countryside is like. Peace and quiet, the sounds of nature, no road noise, cows and sheep in the nearby fields, horse riders and dog walkers going by. For me, it is the perfect de-stress antidote to everyday stresses and strains that we all have.”

Naomi Stuart

Naomi Stuart (pictured) curates and documents her countryside lifestyle on her Instagram page @grove_cottage_

With COVID-19 grounding most of the world, “home” has taken on a new meaning. And as we make sense of our new normal, the focus is being placed firmly on living a simple and slower life.

Cottagecore is a concept that anyone can embrace. Look at decorating your home in a traditional, old fashioned style and take up skills such as drying flowers, spending time growing vegetables and enjoying time in the evening by candlelight with loved ones. The interpretation of cottagecore spans a gamut of ideas, from slow fashion to home décor, home cooked meals, and gardening.

"Cottagecore is a concept that anyone can embrace"

Says Lucy Blackall, who documents her cottagecore journey on Instagram as @hercountryliving, “Many of my followers have messaged me about escapism and realism and have expressed that following my page helps their mental health as well as giving them something to aspire too which is very humbling and wonderful for me.”

Lucy Blackall

Lucy Blackall 

Lucy is adamant that adopting a cottagecore lifestyle doesn’t have to be hard.

“I would suggest starting small by creating calm serene spaces in the home with limited technology, light furnishings, vintage and antique furniture and fabrics and spending more time with plants and animals. I think there can be a misconception about cottagecore that it is [performative or] not real, but for me and many others we are really sharing our true selves and life on social media.”

Dami Fawehinmi who lives in the UK admits that the lockdown forced her to slow down and enjoy the natural world around her. “I had lived in my village for 15 years but visited new places within it for the first time [during lockdown]. I loved posting my nature journeys on my personal Instagram account @JournalsOfDami and one thing I am big about is finding a community of people that enjoy the things you do. But when I'd search for nature spaces [online], they were mostly white people and did not post people that looked like me, a Black woman. Over time I'd feel more and more like I didn't belong, I just wanted a place to share my love for nature and simple cute things with other Black people, eventually I came across cottagecore.”

"Lucy is adamant that adopting a cottagecore lifestyle doesn’t have to be hard"

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dami⚡Culture curator✨ (@journalsofdami)

 

This is what led Dami to start House Of Cottagecore Black where Black women and non-binary people can come together to share their experiences and their passions. “A space that promotes their unapologetic beautiful existence. Every day, I am learning from this beautiful community how to be better in what I do and what I practice. We need a world for our future, we need to look after it and we also need to look after our mental health, doing what makes us happy. For me practicing cottagecore is looking after my plants, planning my homestead with my online cottagecore friends, baking and so much more. It is about looking after you.”

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