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Good News: Possible Roman road discovered in a field in Britain

BY Alice Gawthrop

10th Feb 2023 Good News

Good News: Possible Roman road discovered in a field in Britain

A waterworks maintenance team discovered a possible one-of-a-kind Roman road in a field in Worcestershire that may date back 2,000 years

If asked to name a place where you might make a once-in-a-lifetime archaeological discovery, your mind may go to the pyramids of Egypt or the peaks of the Andes…not a field in Worcestershire. 

But a field in Worcestershire is exactly where workmen recently discovered what is thought to be a Roman road up to 2,000 years old!

The discovery of the road

The road was discovered during routine waterworks maintenance by Severn Trent. Archaeological experts from Wychavon District Council were called to the scene and immediately recognised the finding’s significance. 

Wychavon District Council’s archaeology officer Aidan Smyth said, “When I first saw it, it took my breath away. If proven to be from the first century AD, it would be beyond rare.”

Evesham Roman road

Evesham Roman road

Experts say it is constructed in a traditional Roman technique, with similar roads only being found in Rome and Pompeii. Ruts in the stones show that it was used by carts for a long time. A team from Historic England is expected to investigate further to determine the exact origin of the structure.

Worcestershire’s rich history

This is actually not the first significant historical discovery in Worcestershire. A number of possible forts have been suggested in Worcestershire since the 1950s, and Worcester is thought to be possibly have been the site for the Roman town of Vertis.

"If it is indeed a first-century Roman road, then it is the only one of its kind in Britain"

It is too early to say without 100 per cent certainty that the road is Roman, but even if it is a medieval road it will still be a nationally significant discovery. If it is indeed a first-century Roman road, then it is the only one of its kind in Britain—that we know of, anyway! Who knows what we’ll find next in a field in, say, Lincolnshire?

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