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Candi Staton: If I Ruled The World

BY Becca Inglis

14th Jul 2023 Celebrities

Candi Staton: If I Ruled The World

Candi Staton, the “First Lady of Southern Soul” whose disco and soul hits have earned four Grammy nominations, shares her vision for an ideal world

I would spread the love of God all over the world

I think that’s what’s missing—love in the world. There’s a lot of division. If we just had the love of God in our heart, we would be able to treat each other with respect and honour instead of hate. That would be the first thing I would try to do.

Women would be responsible for their own body

Men in politics would have no right to our bodies. Right now, we have men and politics, men in high places, controlling women.

Women have always been kind of neglected or looked down or mistreated in our world. We were the lesser people. We were not respected. We were used.

"Women are very smart. We know our bodies"

Men had all of this power, and women had absolutely no power. We were born and raised to respect and obey.

But women are very smart. We know our bodies. Men think that they know our bodies, but they don’t.

Candi Staton singing onstageCredit: Guus Krol, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0, via Flickr

There would be no hunger for anyone in the world

No homeless people. No poor people. Everyone in the world would have more than enough.

Now, we don’t have more than enough. Children are starving. Seniors are neglected. There’s no equality, even in our jobs. Women make less money.

"If we had equality, our hearts would go out to the poor, instead of taxing them over what they can afford"

But the rich have more than enough. They throw away more food than we could ever eat.

If we had equality, our hearts would go out to the poor, instead of taxing them over what they can afford.

Everybody in the world would have health insurance

There would be no premature death. We could afford good healthcare. It wouldn’t be overpriced, like insulin was a few months ago.

Our government saw to it that the medicine came down so people with sugar diabetes could afford to have insulin at $35 a month, when before it was hundreds of dollars. They couldn’t afford it and people were dying and people were getting sick.

Big Pharma would have to be a little bit more lenient towards the poor.

Candi Staton, first lady of Southern soulCredit: Guus Krol, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0, via Flickr

There would be peace in the world

No more wars. No more school shootings. No guns for kids underage killing each other. We would find a way to get the guns off the street, so kids would stop buying them.

Here in Atlanta, we have three or four teenage shootings a week, 15 and 16-year-olds shooting each other.

"We would find a way to get the guns off the street, so kids would stop buying them"

They don’t fight like we did when we were their age. I’m 83. When I was going to school, if you were bullied, you just had a fight. We didn’t shoot each other. We didn’t have knives. We didn’t kill each other.

They just fought until they got tired. The bullies were beaten, some of them, and they didn’t try to be bullies again.

That would be one thing that I would try to stop.

Education for everybody that wants it

Colleges would drop high interest rates on loans, so students would not have to work the rest of their lives trying to pay off their loan.

That’s why a lot of kids don’t go to school, because they can’t afford it. And that’s why we have so many gangs in the streets, because parents can’t afford to send their kids to college. They can’t afford to get them into sport. They can’t afford a lot of stuff.

And so the kids make their own families per se. They end up in gangs and spreading violence in the streets, because they get bored. They don’t have anything else to do.

We’re working on that even now, to try to get kids in different types of environments. There are buildings going up that will teach kids how to do sports and how to play basketball and do things after school, so they don’t get into trouble on the streets.

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