Review: Something to Hide by Deborah Moggach

James Walton

Deborah Moggach is back with Something to Hide, a charming, witty story about the complex relationships in later life.

The Synopsis

Petra's romantic life has always been a car-crash, and even in her sixties she's still capable of getting it disastrously wrong. But then she falls in love with Jeremy, an old chum, visiting from abroad. The fatal catch? Jeremy is her best friend's husband. But just as Petra is beginning to relax into her happy ever after, she finds herself catapulted to West Africa, and to Bev, her best friend who she's been betraying so spectacularly. Meanwhile, on opposite sides of the world, two other women are also struggling with the weight of betrayal: Texan Lorrie is about embark on the biggest deception of her life, and in China Li-Jing is trying to understand exactly what it is her husband does on his West African business trips...It turns out that no matter where you are in the world, everyone has something to hide. Can Bev - can anyone - be trusted?

 

Something to Hide by Deborah Moggach
Something To Hide By Deborah Moggach
Chatto & Windus, £12.99

 

The Review

Deborah Moggach is now best known for These Foolish Things—her 2004 book that’s since been renamed after the film based on it: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. In fact, though, she’s been writing smart, funny and highly entertaining novels since 1978, most of them casting a beady yet tolerant eye on the relationships between men and women.

The main character in Something to Hide is Petra, a 60-year-old Londoner, whose most recent choice of bloke has just proved characteristically disastrous. But then her old friend Jeremy comes to London on business from West Africa, where he lives with his wife—her even older friend Bev. Awkwardly for all concerned, Petra and Jeremy begin to fall in love and…well, an awful lot happens, none of which I can possibly reveal here.

Nonetheless, amid the many subplots and twists, it’s still Petra who steals the show—as the latest Moggach heroine forced to acknowledge her failure (both annoying and rather exciting) to gain romantic wisdom as she gets older.

Listen to an interview with Deborah Moggach in our July podcast

Deborah Moggach's books and DVDs are available from the Reader's Digest Shop. 

Listen to Deborah discuss Something to Hide on the Reader's Digest podcast