In this new series, food writer and blogger Helen Best-Shaw takes a fresh look at a staple or neglected store cupboard ingredient and suggests new ways to use it. This month, we look at Paddington Bear's favourite sandwich filling: marmalade.

Marmalade is a staple on many British breakfast tables, and is something that I sometimes miss when travelling. In Britain, marmalade almost exclusively is used to describe a citrus jam, usually made with bitter Seville oranges. I am sure that the children’s nursery rhyme was inspired at least in part by the British love of marmalade?

Oranges and lemons,
Say the bells of St. Clement's
.

The annual Marmalade awards held at Dalemain Mansion in Cumbria are now in their 10th year, with nearly 2,400 entries being received in the homemade category from all over the world this year, with record entries expected next year. All entries receive a certificate and a feedback card from the judges, so if you pride yourself on your marmalade, why not enter?

As well as on toast, marmalade is a wonderfully versatile ingredient and here are my favourite ways to both make it and use it.

1. How to Make Marmalade Step by Step

Marmalade

My friend Michelle, an ex-pat South African, who lived in a tiny village in the east of England, made friends with her neighbour Gwen who taught her how to make marmalade. With step-by-step instructions and stunning photos, this is the ultimate marmalade masterclass, taught by an expert. 
Take a look

2. Seville Marmalade with Cointreau

Seville Marmalade with Cointreau

With an indulgent twist on traditional marmalade, this version has some added Cointreau—and some handy hints on what to do if disaster strikes and your marmalade does not set. It is fixable!
Get the recipe

3. Soft White Bread

White Bread

Homemade bread is so much nicer than shop bread, and homemade marmalade really does deserve homemade bread too. I’ve added yoghurt to a white loaf) to make beautifully soft and fluffy white bread.  Perfect for sandwiches I am sure it would be Paddington Bear’s choice to keep under his hat
Get the recipe

4. Spelt Bread

Spelt Bread

If all the kneading to make bread sounds like hard work, or if you do not have a stand mixer with a dough hook, then I recommend making a no-knead loaf such as this spelt and whole grain loaf. The bread might be a little denser, but still delicious.
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5. Falafel wraps

Falafel Wraps

The intrinsic sourness of marmalade makes it perfect in savoury dishes; chicken joints coated roasted in marmalade is a classic. I also really like the look of this healthier and lighter dish, a wrap filled with falafels, goat’s cheese and marmalade.
Get the recipe

6. Marmalade & Carrot Cake  

Marmalade and Carrot Cake

The addition of banana, dried fruit and seeds makes this marmalade and carrot cake a fibre-packed, positively healthy treat—you truly can have your cake and eat it.
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7. Marmalade Bread & Butter Pudding  

Marmalade Bread and Butter Pudding

Paddington Bear would certainly approve of this marmalade bread and butter pudding, which is basically marmalade sandwiches, in this case impressively made with home-made butter, baked in a creamy custard. 
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8. Chocolate Orange cupcakes

Chocolate and Marmalade Cup Cakes

Chocolate and orange is a classic paring, this batch of chocolate & marmalade cupcakes, from Bangers & Mash uses the best part of a pot, and has a delightful story encouraging less confident bakers to go and bake.
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9. Marmalade Chocolate Cake

Marmalade Chocolate Cake

This chocolate and orange sponge cake is baked with marmalade in the sponge and is filled with marmalade cream. Using duck eggs in baking will give a richer flavour and a fluffier cake, in this case you can substitute 4 hens eggs for the 3 ducks eggs.
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Top Tip: for a gluten-free alternative try this recipe

 

10. Marmalade Coconut Semolina Cake

Marmalade Semolina Cake

I’d have never thought of pairing marmalade and coconut. In this recipe on Recipes from a Pantry a simple marmalade loaf cake made with semolina and coconut is soaked in an orange-blossom syrup to give it a hint of the Middle East. Delicious!  Easy to serve and no need to decorate.
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Helen Best-Shaw, is a freelance food & recipe writer and blogger at <a data-cke-saved-href="http://fussfreeflavours.com” arget=" href="http://fussfreeflavours.com” arget=" _blank"="">Fuss Free Flavours.

Read more articles by Helen Best-Shaw here

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