There are plenty of amazing films to get excited about this month: from the pure escapism of Justice League through the dark and dangerous mind games of director Yorgos Lanthimos, to the incredible documentary on the shower scene from Psycho—there's something for everyone. 

78/52

A meticulously researched and elegantly cinematic tribute to one of the most important scenes in the history of cinema: the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho.

Similarly to 2015’s Hitchcock/Truffaut which traced Hitch’s encounter with French New Wave trailblazer Francois Truffaut, it’s cinema geek paradise: we’re treated to an obsessively in-depth analysis of the film—from camerawork to sound via Janet Leigh’s fingernails.

The documentary includes interviews with such directors as Guillermo del Toro and Eli Roth discussing Psycho’s influence on horror cinema as well as people who have a more personal connection to the movie: Janet Leigh’s daughter Jamie Lee Curtis, Hitchcock's granddaughter Tere Carrubba and Leigh’s body double Marli Renfro—an unknown 21-year-old pinup model who spent a week getting stabbed in a shower for $500. 

 

The Killing of a Sacred Deer 

From the director of dark indie hit The Lobster comes an equally disturbing and far more sinister horror elegy, starring Colin Farrell and Nicole Kidman. When an impassive surgeon takes a peculiar boy under his wing, strange things begin to happen in his own family, forcing him to make the hardest decision of his life. It’s a constricted, miasmic narrative, oozing nightmarish anxiety like an infected wound. Heavy—but good for your moral fibres.

 

Paddington 2

Everyone’s favourite bear gets into all kinds of new trouble in the sequel to the instant family classic. Now happily settled in with the Browns, he picks up a few jobs to save money for the perfect present for his Aunt Lucy’s 100th birthday—a unique pop-up book. But when the book is stolen, it’s up to him to find the thief. There’s nothing not to love about this film.

From Paul King’s consistently brilliant writing to fantastically over-the-top supporting performances from Hugh Grant (as a faded egotistic actor) and Brendan Gleeson (as rough prison cook Knuckles McGinty), it’s heart-warming, quintessentially British and an absolute must-see if you’re a fan of the first film.

Out on November 10

 

The Florida Project 

The purest, most big-hearted release this month comes from one of the most exciting young directors around, Sean Baker. The Florida Project follows six-year-old Moonee and her playmates as they wreak havoc upon a motel in a rundown part of Orlando where she lives with her troubled but well-meaning mother Halley (played superbly by first-time actress Bria Vinaite whom Baker found on Instagram).

Willem Defoe delivers a disarming performance as the grumpy but kind-hearted motel manager Bobby, and Brooklynn Prince is a sheer force of nature as little Moonee. 

It’s one of those movies where something major happens only once or twice throughout the entire film. Yet the extensive interludes of stillness in between are the marrow of The Florida Project, where the true cinema magic happens.

Out on November 10

 

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool 

Just when you thought Annette Bening had reached the zenith of her career, she goes and blows you away again. This time it’s as Fifties film star Gloria Grahame, who finds herself having a passionate yet troubled affair with a much younger man, sensitively played by Jamie Bell. It’s a divinely shot biopic, full of saturated, sparkling cinematography that shifts between sun-drenched LA and rainy Liverpool—a perfect autumn movie.

Out on November 16

 

Justice League 

In the latest all-singing, all-dancing DC superhero movie, Batman assembles an unprecedented team of metahumans—Wonder Woman, Flash, Aquaman and Cyborg—to save the planet from a catastrophic threat. Featuring an all-star cast including Ben Affleck, Gal Gadot and Jason Momoa, it’s a spunky, fast-paced blockbuster dripping with coolness.

Out on November 17

 

Battle of the Sexes

A fun, light-hearted retelling of Billie Jean King’s 1973 triumph over Bobby Riggs in a match that became a milestone in the public acceptance of women’s tennis. Though the writing turns to tired film clichés a bit too often, the sheer charisma and magnetism of leads Emma Stone and Steve Carell make it an enjoyable way to spend two hours. Alan Cumming and Sarah Silverman co-star.

Out on November 24 

 

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