Hilarious satires, sci-fi masterpieces and touching biopics are among our top cinema picks this October. 

Blade Runner 2049

In this sequel to the 1982 cult classic, a  young blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), unearths a dangerous secret that threatens to destroy what’s left of society. This discovery takes him on a quest to find the former blade runner Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) who’s been missing for 30 years. Featuring a superb supporting cast, chilling dystopian visuals and a score you won’t forget.

 

Loving Vincent 

The life of the “father of modern art”, Vincent van Gogh, is told by his paintings and the familiar characters who inhabit them in this exquisite, hand-painted film. Douglas Booth stars as young Armand Roulin, who takes it upon himself to solve the mystery of the painter’s death. Mesmirisingly conceived, this is probably the most beautiful film you’ll see this year—a fitting tribute to van Gogh’s life and work.

Out on October 13

 

The Party

All Janet wanted was a small, quiet party to celebrate her important new position. But when you’re friends with a group of neurotic, embittered intellectuals hiding dark secrets, it doesn’t always turn out that way. This hilarious and biting chamber comedy boasts a whip-smart script and a handful of deliciously exaggerated characters played by Timothy Spall, Cillian Murphy, Kristin Scott Thomas and others—with a particularly fiery performance from Patricia Clarkson at the centre.

Out on October 13

 

The Death of Stalin 

“Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer” is the main lesson of The Death of Stalin. Except that, in Soviet Russia, you never really know who your friends are. This hilarious satire from comedy genius Armando Iannucci follows the final days of Joseph Stalin and the cut-throat fight for power that ensues after his death.

Soviet officials speak with Cockney and New York accents, proclamations of love for the fatherland are the core of every conversation and casual executions punctuate them like commas. Starring Steve Buscemi, Jason Isaacs, Rupert Friend and many others, it’s a brash, grotesque and hilarious history lesson with non-stop gags flying at you like a Stalinist fist.

Out on October 20

 

Breathe

At 28, Robin Cavendish was paralysed from the neck down due to polio. Despite being given only a few months to live, he survived for another 36 years, becoming a prominent advocate for the disabled. Although a truly remarkable story, the film’s efforts to bring out the characters’ emotional nuances fall short. Still, Andrew Garfield makes Breathe worth seeing—his impish, utterly lovable facial expressions are worthy of an Oscar nod.

Out on October 27

 

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